Women’s March Jan 21, 2017 – A Day We Will Always Remember

Women's March Why I March Protest January 21 2017 Feminism

This isn’t a post about Trump. This is a post about strength, support and equality. 

This is a post about how a misogynist man just jump-started an entire revolution against him. 

I first heard about the Women’s March from my mother, who was invited to head to D.C. by her former high school friends. Unfortunately, it was too late to request taking time off work so I wasn’t able to attend the monumental #WomensMarchOnWashington

I quickly learned that there would be a solidarity march in Montreal, and despite having been fighting an illness for the past four weeks, I knew I had to be there. 

I’ve never felt passionate enough about other local protests to attend them – but this was different. This isn’t just a USA problem, this is a world problem and we need to show all of our leaders and business owners and policy makers that we aren’t fucking around. 

 

 

A protest doesn’t have a tangible effect. It’s not like donating to a charity and watching your money buy food or your used clothing go to someone in need. Instead, a protest is a political statement that shows the aggressors that we aren’t going to put up with their shit. It shows solidarity with the women and marginalized people of the USA that we support them. We see them, we hear them and we are going to fight alongside them. It shows our Canadian politicians that we are not going to allow them to get away with racist, sexist and homophobic agendas. It shows the world that women are going to keep fighting for equality, no matter what is thrown our way. 

January 21, 2017 is a day that will be remembered in history forever. It was the greatest political protest that the world has ever seen. It caused activism in every single continent. It caused people to resist, people to speak up, people to band together to show the haters of the world that we won’t back down. 

I am so grateful to have been able to be part of this social movement. Myself and 5000 other Montrealers cheered loudly at speeches, sang along to performances and showed the world just how beautiful our diversity is in Montreal. 

I have a lot more to say on the topic, but I just want to briefly mention that I am aware of the privilege I have as a white cis-woman to feel safe attending a protest. If it had turned violent, I would most likely not be the first one targeted. If it had turned violent, a criminal record as an ‘activist’ would not be detrimental to my career. While we (white & cis people) protest for equality, we must always realize our privilege in being able to publicly voice our discontent. While we protest for equality, we must always remember that equality MUST be intersectional. We must fight for those who are unable to fight for themselves or who might risk danger to their lives by being vocal. If your feminism isn’t intersectional, then you’re doing it wrong. 

January 21, 2017 is going to be a day that our kids and grandkids learn about. We have to make sure both our sons and our daughters know just how significant this day has been. 

Below are some great photos from the #ManifDesFemmes in Montreal.

 

Women's March Why I March Protest January 21 2017 Feminism

Women's March Why I March Protest January 21 2017 Feminism

Women's March Why I March Protest January 21 2017 Feminism

Women's March Why I March Protest January 21 2017 Feminism

Women's March Why I March Protest January 21 2017 Feminism

Women's March Why I March Protest January 21 2017 Feminism

If you want to chat about the march please comment below or send me an e-mail! <3

 

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